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What A Match, WHAT A SERIES, What Proteas!

It might be a few days late but our guest writer Geoff Wakefield have finally recovered from all the celebrations with the Proteas victory in India and he has a look at what transpired and where the series heads next.

The Proteas have sealed their first ever bilateral ODI series win in India. Sure, they needed two bites at the cherry, but in the end they swallowed the opportunity, stone and all, just to make sure they got the job done.

AB de Villiers once again underlined his status as one of the all-time greats of the format with a sublime display of batsman ship, the likes of which Proteas fans are becoming accustomed too. Since 2010, the lowest the Affies-schooled player has averaged in a calendar year has been 50.56. In that period his average strike rate has been nearly 111.

To underline that greatness, AB is the only batsman in the history of the format who has scored at least 500 runs in a career, who averages over 50 per innings and has a career strike rate over 100.

All this is not to say that the contributions of Quinton de Kock and a physically drained Faf du Plessis were nothing by comparison. Far from it actually. Without QDK’s love of Indian offerings or Faf’s following of the Jacques Henry Kallis manual in the Proteas ODI line up, AB would not have been able to play with the kind of freedom that perhaps only he can fully exploit.

The bowlers also stepped up, helped by the massive boost given to them by their batsmen. Kagiso Rabada and Dale Steyn were sensational and Kyle Abbott performed his role to perfection.

All that said, I do feel for Khaya Zondo. As the spare batsman selected in the squad, he deserved his shot and instead Dean Elgar, a late replacement no less, was drafted in. That does deserve to be questioned.

Moving on.

The limited overs hors d’oeuvres were tantalising, leaving not only fans but the Proteas squad themselves wanting more, and more is exactly what is on the way.

The main course of four Tests sees some ingredient changes, but the kitchen is still just as hot and the resulting dishes to be served are sure to be as spicy, if not more so, than what has come before.

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